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Disability and povertyA global challenge$

Arne H. Eide and Benedicte Ingstad

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9781847428851

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847428851.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM POLICY PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.policypress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Policy Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PPSO for personal use.date: 06 December 2021

(p.v) Notes on contributors

(p.v) Notes on contributors

Source:
Disability and poverty
Publisher:
Policy Press

  • Arwa Baider

    is a paediatrician, and has previously worked at the University Hospital in Sanaʼa, Yemen as director of the Child Health Directorate, at the Ministry of Health in Yemen and as national coordinator of Integrated Management of Childhood Illness, American Red Cross. She is currently working as a medical officer at UNICEF in Yemen.

  • Stine Hellum Braathen

    is a research scientist at SINTEF Global Health and Welfare, and a PhD student at the Department of Psychology, University of Stellenbosch, South Africa. She holds a Master's degree in international community health (University of Oslo), and a Bachelor's degree in arts (anthropology) from the University of Western Australia. Her area of expertise is disability research, with a focus on equity in health and service delivery, as well as issues of sexuality and gender.

  • Tsitsi Chataika

    is a post-doctoral research fellow at the Centre for Rehabilitation Studies, Stellenbosch University, South Africa, and a research fellow at the Centre for Global Health, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. Her research interests are in disability and development, postcolonial theory and inclusive education.

  • Kudakwashe Dube's

    background is in business studies and development studies, with an MBA from Business School Netherlands. He is currently Chief Executive Officer of the Secretariat of the Africa Decade of Persons with Disabilities (SADPD) based in Cape Town, South Africa, with programme activities in 25 African countries.

  • Odd Edvardsen

    is Associate Professor of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Science, Tromsø University College. Edvardsen is also a board member of the Tromsø Mine Victim Resource Centre, University Hospital North Norway. Since the 1980s he has been working with popular movements and local hospitals in the Middle East, Afghanistan and South-East Asia. He has published extensively in international medical journals on trauma management.

  • Arne H. Eide

    is Chief Scientist at SINTEF and Professor in Rehabilitation at Sør-Trøndelag University College, both in Norway. He is also a visiting professor at Stellenbosch University, South Africa. Eide has 20 years of research experience in low-income countries, and in particular in southern Africa. He has been in charge of a number of large collaborative projects in the fields of disability and rehabilitation, including national and representative studies on living conditions among people with disabilities in eight countries in southern Africa.

  • (p.vi) Heidi Fjeld

    is a postdoctoral fellow in the Section for Medical Anthropology and Medical History, Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, Norway. Her background is in social anthropology and Tibetan studies, and her research interests include poverty, disability and access to social welfare in China and Tibet. Heidi contributed equally to the research and writing of Chapter Two with co-author Gry Sagli.

  • Lisbet Grut

    is a sociologist working at SINTEF, Norway. Grut has long experience in research on disability issues, with a special interest in research questions on disability, life course and rehabilitation. She has participated in research in Norway and in several African countries. With respect to disability and poverty issues, she has undertaken research regarding people's experiences of barriers to public services and income.

  • Camilla Hansen

    is a research fellow/PhD candidate at Section for Medical Anthropology and Medical History, Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo. She is a social anthropologist and a nurse with two long ethnographic fieldwork and research projects in South Africa. Her research interests include poverty and disability, interconnections and, in particular, the role of disabled people's organisations in this regard.

  • Hans Husum

    is Associate Professor of Surgery in the Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway, and centre head at Tromsø Mine Victim Resource Centre, University Hospital North Norway. Since the 1980s he has worked with popular movements and local hospitals in the Middle East, Afghanistan and South-East Asia. He has published extensively in international medical journals on trauma management.

  • Benedicte Ingstad

    is a social anthropologist who has specialised and written extensively in medical anthropology. She is Professor in Medical Anthropology at University of Oslo and has been engaged by SINTEF in southern Africa and the Middle East. Together with Susan Reynolds Whyte she published Disability and Culture and Disability in Global and Local Worlds (both University of California Press). Both books are said to be classics in the field of cross-cultural disability studies. Benedicte Ingstad has carried out fieldwork on disability issues in Botswana, Kenya, Tanzania, Zimbabwe, Malawi, South Africa, Yemen, Cambodia and China.

  • Mitch E. Loeb

    is a health scientist, currently at the National Centre for Health Statistics in Hyattsville, Maryland, USA. At the time of writing he was a senior researcher at SINTEF, Oslo, Norway. He holds a Master's degree in community health and epidemiology (Queen's University Canada) and a Bachelor's degree in biology (University of Toronto/Trent University Canada). His area of expertise is disability definition and measurement.

  • (p.vii) Malcolm MacLachlan

    is Associate Professor at the Centre for Global Health and School of Psychology, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland and Extraordinary Professor of Disability and Development at Stellenbosch University, South Africa. His research interests are in disability, international aid and culture. He has published 13 books and over 150 academic papers and book chapters. He has former experience of working as a clinical psychologist and management consultant.

  • Gubela Mji

    is the Director for the Centre for Rehabilitation Studies at Stellenbosch University in Cape Town, South Africa. Her interests are in disability, human rights and indigenous knowledge systems. She is the current chairperson for the African Network for Evidence-to-Action on disability (AfriNEAD), www.afrinead.org.

  • Jennifer Muderedzi

    obtained her MSc in occupational therapy at the University of Kent in 1997, and an MPhil in international community health from the University of Oslo in 2006. She is currently a lecturer in psychosocial occupational therapy at the University of Zimbabwe. Her major interests are gender and disability studies.

  • Alister Munthali

    holds a PhD in anthropology from Rhodes University, South Africa, and an MA in medical anthropology from University of Amsterdam. He is currently an Associate Professor of Research in the Centre for Social Research, University of Malawi and also teaches in the Department of Sociology.

  • Herbert Muyinda

    is Assistant Lecturer in the Child Health and Development Centre, Faculty of Medicine, Makerere University, Uganda. His main research interests are sexuality and sexually transmitted diseases (including HIV/AIDS), disability, conflict and poverty.

  • Thabale J. Ngulube

    is a physician and researcher in Zambia. Ngulube is also a trained health economist. He has worked as a lecturer at the University of Zambia in the School of Medicine and at the Institute of Economic and Social Research. He is Senior Research Fellow and Knowledge Consultant in the Centre for Health, Science and Social Research. He has undertaken a number of research and scholarly works on the Zambian health sector with a particular focus on the health reforms and the health system as well as on equity in health. He is a co-founder of the Equity Gauge Zambia initiative, an approach to assessing, monitoring and enhancing policies and outcomes on equity in health and healthcare.

  • Sekai Nhiwatiwa

    is a psychiatrist currently involved in clinical work as well as being a member of staff in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Zimbabwe Medical School. She has been head of the Department of Psychiatry and was involved in different research activities including the living conditions study among individuals with disabilities in Zimbabwe together with SINTEF (p.viii) in 2003. She has also been involved in substance abuse research in the region including international partners such as the World Health Organization.

  • Joyce Olenja

    is a medical anthropologist with a PhD from Cambridge University, England. She teaches social science and health and is currently the head of community health sciences in the School of Public Health at University of Nairobi. Her areas of research interest are issues concerning reproductive health, particularly maternal health and disability.

  • Gry Sagli

    is a senior researcher in the department of Medical Anthropology and Medical History, Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, Norway. She has a background in physiotherapy and studies in Chinese culture and language (PhD). Her research interests encompass sociocultural perspectives on Chinese medicine in Norway and China and disability, poverty and access to social welfare in China. Gry contributed equally to the research and writing of Chapter Two with co-author Heidi Fjeld.

  • Washeila Sait

    received an MPhil in disability studies from the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, South Africa. Her current position is Director at WBanien Consulting, which deals in issues of disability matters and organisational development and research.

  • Merete Taksdal

    is a project coordinator in Tromsø Mine Victim Resource Centre She has been working with international health and relief work for the last 20 years. Merete is a registered nurse and nurse anaesthetist and has a Master's degree in public health. Her research interests include social anthropology and ethics.

  • Gert van Rooy

    is head of the Social Sciences Division at University of Namibia (UNAM) and Deputy Director of the Multidisciplinary Research and Consultancy Center at UNAM. He has a BA and MA in development studies from the University of Leeds, UK, and is currently completing a PhD. He has published widely, both academic papers and project reports, and is engaged in international research collaboration. He is currently the country coordinator for a large EU-funded research study on accessibility and quality of health services for vulnerable groups.

  • Margaret Wazakili

    is a post-doctoral research fellow at the Centre for Rehabilitation Studies, Stellenbosch University, South Africa and a research fellow at the Centre for Global Health, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. Her research interests are in disability, sexuality and HIV and AIDS, disability and inclusive development.

  • (p.ix) Susan Reynolds Whyte,

    Professor at the Department of Anthropology, University of Copenhagen, has done extensive fieldwork in East Africa. Her areas of interest include family relations and social change, the management of misfortune, health and healthcare systems, disability, medicines and international development. She was co-editor of Disability and Culture (1995) and Disability in Local and Global Worlds (2007) both published by University of California Press.

(p.x)