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Governing health and consumptionSensible citizens, behaviour and the city$
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Clare Herrick

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9781847426383

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847426383.001.0001

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Spatial governance and the night-time economy

Spatial governance and the night-time economy

Chapter:
(p.173) Eight Spatial governance and the night-time economy
Source:
Governing health and consumption
Author(s):

Clare Herrick

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847426383.003.0008

This chapter explores the rise of London's night-time economy as a particular example of the potentially risky environments within which individuals are being asked to regulate and modify their own behaviour. Just as with the food economy, London's night-time economy — composed of the nation's largest selection of bars, pubs and nightclubs — is now an important element of the city's broader economic success. Beyond the issues raised by the commodification and commercialisation of the night-time experience, changing drinking environments also raise associated questions of how these may problematise existing codes of sanctioned behaviour. Indeed, with the conscious efforts to create the ‘24-hour city’, or to encourage ‘café culture’ through licensing reform, the ways in which people drink and, therefore, the risks associated with these practices, have inevitably altered.

Keywords:   London, night-time economy, food economy, nightclubs, drinking environments

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