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Global Child Poverty and Well-beingMeasurement, Concepts, Policy and Action$
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Alberto Minujin and Shailen Nandy

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9781847424822

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847424822.001.0001

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Assessing child well-being in developing countries: making policies work for children

Assessing child well-being in developing countries: making policies work for children

Chapter:
(p.245) Ten Assessing child well-being in developing countries: making policies work for children
Source:
Global Child Poverty and Well-being
Author(s):

Shirley Gatenio Gabel

Sheila B. Kamerman

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847424822.003.0010

Indicators of child well being grew exponentially in the last four decades in both industrialized and developing countries. While efforts continue to develop comparative indicators of child well-being across countries, far less attention is focused on generating organized and comparative data on policies affecting children in developing countries and related outcome measures. This paper summarizes the history and trends in measuring child well-being and policies and examines the availability of data to create a global database on child policies and policy outcomes. Numerous efforts are currently underway to develop composite indicators of child well-being at all geographic levels but these indicators are unlikely to be tied to existing and emerging child policies. A paradigm for categorizing child policies and outcome measures across countries is offered. The lack of comparative data on policies affecting children in developing countries and outcomes is seen as an obstacle to furthering the development of policies that promote child well-being.

Keywords:   Child well-being, child policies, comparative, developing countries, indicators

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