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Volume 2: Housing and Home$
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Brian Doucet, Rianne van Melik, and Pierre Filion

Print publication date: 2021

Print ISBN-13: 9781529218961

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: January 2022

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781529218961.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM POLICY PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.policypress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Policy Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PPSO for personal use.date: 03 July 2022

Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.199) Eighteen Conclusion
Source:
Volume 2: Housing and Home
Author(s):

Brian Doucet

Pierre Filion

Rianne van Melik

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781529218961.003.0018

This chapter reflects on how addressing the structural inequalities rendered visible during the COVID-19 pandemic requires centering the lived experiences of poverty, housing precarity, and discrimination within planning and policymaking. It emphasizes how planning and policymaking that center on disadvantaged citizens and minority groups are necessary in order to shape a more equitable and socially-just urban future. It also points out how the pandemic amplified and magnified existing economic, social, spatial, and racial inequalities, particularly when it comes to housing. The chapter highlights how COVID-19 tore back the curtain on many of the pre-existing inequalities. It stresses that many of the solutions that scholars and advocates have been calling for many years, such as new social housing, banning unjust evictions, rent controls, and curbing property speculation, are just as relevant in the age of COVID-19 as they were before.

Keywords:   structural inequalities, COVID-19, COVID pandemic, poverty, housing precarity, discrimination, urban planning, disadvantaged citizens, minority groups

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