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Cities Demanding the EarthA New Understanding of the Climate Emergency$
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Peter Taylor, Geoff O'Brien, and Phil O'Keefe

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781529210477

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781529210477.001.0001

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Inside Out: Fourteen Antitheses Authenticating Cities

Inside Out: Fourteen Antitheses Authenticating Cities

Chapter:
(p.45) 3 Inside Out: Fourteen Antitheses Authenticating Cities
Source:
Cities Demanding the Earth
Author(s):

Peter J. Taylor

Geoff O’Brien

Phil O’Keefe

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781529210477.003.0003

This is the first chapter on unthinking, specifically unthinking modernity. It takes the form of 14 statements that are presented as basic modern theses, and which are countered by antitheses, alternative positions wherein urban demand is central to the argument. This thesis/antithesis device is used to broach three broad areas. First, the relationship between cities and states are considered with the former identified as constituting social development. Second, the role of cities in that social development is used to undermine modern time and spatial framings of change. Third, these contrarian ideas are brought to bear on the study of anthropogenic climate change, inserting cities as mass demand mechanisms. All this unthinking is intended to foster a fundamental mindscape break pointing towards transmodern sensibilities..

Keywords:   Anthropogenic climate change, Thesis/antithesis device, Transmodern, Unthinking modernity, Urban demand

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