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Criminology and Public TheologyOn Hope, Mercy and Restoration$
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Andrew Millie

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781529207392

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781529207392.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM POLICY PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.policypress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Policy Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PPSO for personal use.date: 06 July 2022

Interpreting the Cross: Religion, Structures of Feeling, and Penal Theory and Practice

Interpreting the Cross: Religion, Structures of Feeling, and Penal Theory and Practice

Chapter:
(p.93) 5 Interpreting the Cross: Religion, Structures of Feeling, and Penal Theory and Practice
Source:
Criminology and Public Theology
Author(s):

Tim Gorringe

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781529207392.003.0005

Religious rituals inculcate structures of feeling which determine our social attitudes. Much Christian theology rests on the projection of guilt and a felt need for punishment. This is especially true of the satisfaction theory. Although retributive assumptions are deeply rooted in Scripture they are not alone. Especially in the teaching of Jesus there are equally profound roots for what today is called restorative justice and the Circles of Support and Accountability through which sex offenders, in particular, are dealt with instantiate this. This grounds a quite different theology of redemption to that implied by satisfaction theory.

Keywords:   Structures of feeling, Sin, Crime, Retribution, Restorative justice

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