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The Criminology of Boxing, Violence and Desistance$
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Deborah Jump

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781529203240

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: January 2021

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781529203240.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM POLICY PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.policypress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Policy Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PPSO for personal use.date: 27 June 2022

The Case of Frank: Respect, Embodiment and the Appeal of the Boxing Gym

The Case of Frank: Respect, Embodiment and the Appeal of the Boxing Gym

Chapter:
(p.47) 3 The Case of Frank: Respect, Embodiment and the Appeal of the Boxing Gym
Source:
The Criminology of Boxing, Violence and Desistance
Author(s):

Deborah Jump

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781529203240.003.0004

The pen portrait of Frank demonstrate how boxing offers a medium by which men can re-shape a sense of identity to support valued themes, and also why boxing is appealing particularly for these men having had a prior history of economic, academic and structural disadvantage. Frank’s story discusses how boxing acted as ‘survival training’ in an environment that took violence as a form of defence, Frank’s story talks of childhood bullying, gang violence, and a burning desire to accrue respect at a time when being a young unemployed Black man was viewed negatively by both state and society

Keywords:   Gangs, Bullying, Identity, Knife crime, Youth crime

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