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Negotiating Migration in the Context of Climate ChangeInternational Policy and Discourse$
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Sarah Louise Nash

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781529201260

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781529201260.001.0001

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The Process of Naming: Deconstructing Terminology Used to Conceptualise the Migration and Climate Change Nexus

The Process of Naming: Deconstructing Terminology Used to Conceptualise the Migration and Climate Change Nexus

Chapter:
(p.111) 5 The Process of Naming: Deconstructing Terminology Used to Conceptualise the Migration and Climate Change Nexus
Source:
Negotiating Migration in the Context of Climate Change
Author(s):

Sarah Louise Nash

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781529201260.003.0005

This chapter examines what language is used to label the phenomenon of the migration and climate change nexus, and the quirks and discontinuities of this language use. The nodal point of the phenomenon of the migration and climate change nexus is key to the discussions in this book, for without it the policy-making discourse on migration and climate change would not be possible. The construction of the phenomenon in such a way that it has become accepted as existing, valid, and fixed in some way has allowed for the discourse to be reproduced and for policy-making endeavours to be undertaken. However, there is still a great deal of contention surrounding what the phenomenon is, with it meaning different things to different people. The result is that there is no single clear term that is attached to this phenomenon, with a plethora of language sharing the same discursive space. Equally, the different terms carry different nuances of meaning, which are also shifting as the discourse develops, or depending on who employs the term. The chapter analyses three different discursive constructions that are all prominent in international policy making, before turning to four additional concepts that are also occupying the discursive space.

Keywords:   language, migration, climate change, policy-making discourse, international policy making, policy making

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