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Young and LonelyThe Social Conditions of Loneliness$
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Janet Batsleer and James Duggan

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781447355342

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447355342.001.0001

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Youth work as method

Youth work as method

Chapter:
(p.131) 12 Youth work as method
Source:
Young and Lonely
Author(s):

Janet Batsleer

James Duggan

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447355342.003.0012

This chapter considers the place of youth work projects, and of the importance of engagement, enjoyment, association and accompaniment in the life of neighbourhoods including those visited in the Loneliness Connects Us research. It highlights the work of the youth projects who were involved in the research study and the impact of the austerity on such projects. It suggests however that the commitment to ‘social action’ as a buzzword for youth work should be considered critically , as should medical models of loneliness which lend themselves to the suggestion that interventions by professionals such as social workers or youth workers are needed in order to fix the problem. Rather youth work is considered as part of a social infrastructure designed to facilitate informal learning, advocacy, mutual support and enlivening.

Keywords:   Youth Work, Engagement, Research and Social Action, Association, Enjoyment, Accompaniment, Austerity

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