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Dualisation of Part-Time WorkThe Development of Labour Market Insiders and Outsiders$
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Heidi Nicolaisen, Hanne Kavli, and Ragnhild Steen Jensen

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781447348603

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: January 2020

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447348603.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM POLICY PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.policypress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Policy Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PPSO for personal use.date: 29 May 2020

Part-time working women’s access to other types of flexible working-time arrangements across Europe

Part-time working women’s access to other types of flexible working-time arrangements across Europe

Chapter:
(p.109) 5 Part-time working women’s access to other types of flexible working-time arrangements across Europe
Source:
Dualisation of Part-Time Work
Author(s):

Heejung Chung

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447348603.003.0005

This chapter examines part-time working women's access to flexitime, that is the worker's control over their schedules such as starting and ending times, and time off work (a couple of hours during their working day) to tend to personal issues. It further examines whether this relative access varies across countries. The analysis of data from 30 European countries show that at the European average, part-time workers are more likely to get access to flexitime - showing evidence of a complimentary effect, and are as likely to get access to time off work for personal reasons as full time workers. There was a significant cross-national variance in part-time worker's relative access to flexitime compared to that of full-time workers. Countries where part-time work is more prevalent, where strong centralised unions exist, and family policies are generous were where women generally had better access to flexitime. However, this was especially the case for full-time working women, decreasing the gap between full-time and part-time working women

Keywords:   Part-time, flexible working time arrangement, access, women, Europe, inequality, dualization

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