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The Sociology of Housework$
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Ann Oakley

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781447346166

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447346166.001.0001

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Socialization and Self-Concept

Socialization and Self-Concept

Chapter:
(p.107) 7 Socialization and Self-Concept
Source:
The Sociology of Housework
Author(s):

Ann Oakley

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447346166.003.0007

This chapter explores the connection between the socialization of women and their later performance of the housewife role. Many of the women made it clear in the interviews that their concern is not simply to get housework done in the most efficient way and the shortest possible time. Instead, they are bound up in the replication of previously set standards and routines which may actually frustrate the straightforward goal of simply getting housework done. To the extent that these ways of behaving are inherited from the mother, it can be hypothesized that they are not directly taught from mother to daughter: rather they are indirectly and unconsciously assimilated. The ‘nurturant’ child-caring relationship that exists between housewives and housewives-to-be serves to make this assimilation more likely than not. Subsequently, the learning lesson of domesticity sets up what is essentially a relationship between self (feminine) and role (housewife).

Keywords:   socialization, housewife role, women, housework, housewives, assimilation, domesticity

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