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Marketisation and Privatisation in Criminal Justice$
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Kevin Albertson, Mary Corcoran, and Jake Phillips

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781447345701

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: January 2021

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447345701.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM POLICY PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.policypress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Policy Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PPSO for personal use.date: 05 August 2021

A flawed revolution? Interrogating the Transforming Rehabilitation changes in England and Wales through the prism of a Community Justice Court

A flawed revolution? Interrogating the Transforming Rehabilitation changes in England and Wales through the prism of a Community Justice Court

Chapter:
(p.171) 11 A flawed revolution? Interrogating the Transforming Rehabilitation changes in England and Wales through the prism of a Community Justice Court
Source:
Marketisation and Privatisation in Criminal Justice
Author(s):

Jill Annison

Tim Auburn

Daniel Gilling

Gisella Hanley Santos

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447345701.003.0012

This chapter investigates changes that have taken place in the recent past in relation to interventions with adult offenders in England and Wales, particularly in the context of the application of risk technologies and the increasingly managerial and market-driven set of arrangements. This review draws on criminological frameworks which examine such neo-liberal penal reforms, where social problems have been reframed as crime problems and where the application of the political policy of austerity has brought about the fragmentation and reduction of local services. Quantitative and qualitative data from a 2-year ESRC-funded research project are presented to illustrate and analyse the situations regarding ‘low-level’ offenders, whose cases were heard in a Community Justice Court in a large city in England. Detailed examination of this data reveals a complex picture of offending patterns, social issues and the pre-existing involvement of a wide range of statutory and third-sector agencies, even for many deemed ‘low-risk’ offenders. In many of these cases pathways out of crime seemed elusive, with rehabilitative interventions being framed in terms of penal narratives which emphasised individual responsibility and which denied wider structural problems. This critique raises concerns about the implications and consequences of these issues, particularly in relation to the widescale changes that were brought about by the Transforming Rehabilitation agenda. It argues that for constructive and effective interventions to take place in the field of community sanctions, including the therapeutic justice approach explored here, social justice and a more holistic approach to rehabilitation need to be (re)placed as central pillars of the criminal justice system.

Keywords:   Community Justice Court, Neo-Liberalism, Rehabilitation, Responsibilisation, Community Sanctions, Transforming Rehabilitation

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