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Marketisation and Privatisation in Criminal Justice$
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Kevin Albertson, Mary Corcoran, and Jake Phillips

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781447345701

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: January 2021

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447345701.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM POLICY PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.policypress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Policy Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PPSO for personal use.date: 14 June 2021

The carceral state and the interpenetration of interests: commercial, governmental and civil society interests in criminal justice

The carceral state and the interpenetration of interests: commercial, governmental and civil society interests in criminal justice

Chapter:
(p.47) 3 The carceral state and the interpenetration of interests: commercial, governmental and civil society interests in criminal justice
Source:
Marketisation and Privatisation in Criminal Justice
Author(s):

James Gacek

Richard Sparks

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447345701.003.0004

The expansion and diffusion of the ‘carceral state’ – understood here as the set of institutional configurations and actors that prioritise punishment, containment, detention, and/or incarceration as a means of treating poverty and marginalisation – is a looming contemporary concern. It seems probable that confluent interests from the commercial, governmental, and civil society sectors will, in the absence of robust interrogation, continue to extend the scope of penal supervision in the lives and communities of already marginalised people. Drawing upon a wide range of literature our chapter critically queries the pairing of punishment and the marketisation of criminal justice. For example, is the extension of electronic monitoring simply a convenient use of a handy technology? Or does it involve the inadequately examined delegation of the state’s power to punish? We call into question the troubling relationship between claims of market-as-accountability versus democratic decision-making. By questioning the interpenetration of these interests, our intention is to re-ignite public conversation concerning the legitimacy of current penal developments and to call attention to some alternative paths.

Keywords:   Carceral State, Electronic Monitoring, Punishment, Marketisation, Legitimacy, Criminal Justice

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