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Social Policy Review 31Analysis and Debate in Social Policy, 2019$
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Elke Heins, James Rees, and Catherine Needham

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781447343981

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: January 2020

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447343981.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM POLICY PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.policypress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Policy Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PPSO for personal use.date: 27 May 2022

From the Windrush Generation to the ‘Air Jamaica generation’: local authority support for families with no recourse to public funds

From the Windrush Generation to the ‘Air Jamaica generation’: local authority support for families with no recourse to public funds

Chapter:
(p.129) 6 From the Windrush Generation to the ‘Air Jamaica generation’: local authority support for families with no recourse to public funds
Source:
Social Policy Review 31
Author(s):

Andy Jolly

, Elke Heins, Catherine Needham, James Rees
Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447343981.003.0006

The ‘Air Jamaica generation’ of migrants to the UK over the past 30 years has received less political and scholarly attention than the so-called Windrush generation. Children of this generation are often invisible in social policy discussions because they lack the legal right to paid employment, and are subject to the no recourse to public funds (NRPF) rule. This excludes them from accessing welfare provision, including most social security benefits, council housing and homelessness assistance. This chapter examines support under section 17 of the Children Act 1989, one of the few welfare entitlements which children and families with NRPF retain, arguing that, without access to mainstream social security, section 17 is an inadequate safety net to prevent poverty. The chapter concludes that this is rooted in discriminatory legislation and policy, resulting in situations which, while structural in cause, would be viewed as neglectful if perpetrated by a parent or carer.

Keywords:   Destitution, Immigration, No Recourse to Public Funds, Social Work, Child Poverty

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