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Communities, Archives and New Collaborative Practices$
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Simon Popple, Andrew Prescott, and Daniel Mutibwa

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781447341895

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447341895.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM POLICY PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.policypress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Policy Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PPSO for personal use.date: 25 July 2021

Silver hair, silver tongues, silver screen: recollection, reflection and representation through digital storytelling with older people

Silver hair, silver tongues, silver screen: recollection, reflection and representation through digital storytelling with older people

Chapter:
(p.181) 13 Silver hair, silver tongues, silver screen: recollection, reflection and representation through digital storytelling with older people
Source:
Communities, Archives and New Collaborative Practices
Author(s):

Tricia Jenkins

Pip Hardy

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447341895.003.0013

This chapter discusses the use of Digital Storytelling (DS) with older people. It looks at the benefits of participation in the DS process before considering how these self-representations — organised, selected and told by individuals and shared on their terms — can break down traditional bureaucratic power structures represented by the notion of ‘archive’. The chapter presents two case studies. The first is from Patient Voices, which curates and archives digital stories made under its auspices with the intention of transforming health and social care by conveying the voices of those not usually heard to a worldwide audience. The second is from DigiTales's work with older people through the transnational action research project Silver Stories, which generated an archive of over 160 stories by older people and those who care for them, from five European countries. It shows how DS creates new possibilities for participatory and collaborative approaches to discovering and developing new knowledge, re-positioning participants as co-producers of knowledge and, potentially, as co-researchers.

Keywords:   Digital Storytelling, DS, older people, bureaucratic power structures, digital stories, health and social care, Patient Voices, Silver Stories

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