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Communities, Archives and New Collaborative Practices$
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Simon Popple, Andrew Prescott, and Daniel Mutibwa

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781447341895

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447341895.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM POLICY PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.policypress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Policy Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PPSO for personal use.date: 26 July 2021

Disorderly conduct: the community in the archive

Disorderly conduct: the community in the archive

Chapter:
(p.19) 2 Disorderly conduct: the community in the archive
Source:
Communities, Archives and New Collaborative Practices
Author(s):

Simon Popple

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447341895.003.0002

This chapter examines the transition and alignments of communities through a consideration built around the changing role of the community in the photographic archive and the shift from subjecthood to agency. It also examines the use of the photographic archive as a means of exploring the new potentialities of the community archive. The chapter reflects on the sense of the community as pictured within the archive and the increasing potential of self-archiving and curation afforded by new digital technologies. It draws on recent projects funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) Connected Communities and Digital Transformations schemes. A model in which the disruptive can be privileged and the counterfactual become an essential component of the archivist's armoury is offered.

Keywords:   photographic archive, self-archiving, curation, digital technologies, Arts and Humanities Research Council, AHRC

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