Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Co-Producing ResearchA Community Development Approach$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Sarah Banks, Angie Hart, Kate Pahl, and Paul Ward

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781447340751

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447340751.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM POLICY PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.policypress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Policy Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PPSO for personal use.date: 22 September 2021

On not doing co-produced research: The methodological possibilities and limitations of co-producing research with participants in a prison

On not doing co-produced research: The methodological possibilities and limitations of co-producing research with participants in a prison

Chapter:
(p.135) Seven On not doing co-produced research: The methodological possibilities and limitations of co-producing research with participants in a prison
Source:
Co-Producing Research
Author(s):

Elizabeth Chapman Hoult

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447340751.003.0007

To what extent is it possible to adhere to the principles of co-produced research with communities when the community involved resides in a prison? This chapter explores this question in the context of a science fiction research project which took place in a UK category D men’s prison in 2014-2015. The researcher worked with participants to form a science fiction film discussion group in which films were used to frame conversations about hope and alternative futures in global, community and individual contexts. The impetus for the project was underpinned by two ideas: the exploration of imaginative and speculative representations of utopia; and a methodological aspiration towards the application of arts-based methods to research with a community. There were significant methodological tensions involved in attempting to implement a co-produced methodology in a prison setting. In practice, co-production was jettisoned in favour of a more traditional methodology at the planning, permissions and implementation stages. This chapter charts the course of the decision not to pursue co-production in this context and it explores the reasons why that decision was made. Specific methodological challenges involved in working in a prison are explored and it is argued that sometimes co-production is not appropriate in some settings. It is also suggested that, despite these challenges, there is an argument for the implementation of co-production in prison contexts if the understanding of co-produced methodologies can stretch across projects.

Keywords:   prisons, sciencefiction, coproduced research, plural readings, National Offenders Management Service, coproduction with vulnerable adults, offenders, prison, vulnerable adults

Policy Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.