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Human Rights and Equality in EducationComparative Perspectives on the Right to Education for Minorities and Disadvantaged Groups$
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Sandra Fredman, Meghan Campbell, and Helen Taylor

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781447337638

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447337638.001.0001

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The dynamics of regulating low-fee private schools in Kenya

The dynamics of regulating low-fee private schools in Kenya

Chapter:
(p.25) Two The dynamics of regulating low-fee private schools in Kenya
Source:
Human Rights and Equality in Education
Author(s):

Gilbert Mitullah Omware

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447337638.003.0003

This chapter examines Kenya's current approach to the regulation of low-fee private schools amid the tension between conceiving of education as a commodity provided for profit — where rules of the market determine growth and development — and conceiving of education as a fundamental right that the state must fulfil for every person in its jurisdiction. In Kenya, the contextual term for ‘low-fee’ private schools is ‘APBET’ schools (Alternative Provision of Basic Education and Training), after the 2009 APBET Policy. The Kenyan government still does not know exactly how many APBET schools operate in the country and therefore cannot adequately regulate them. As demonstrated by the fragmentation in the regulation of these schools, it reveals that there is a need to consolidate the incorporation, registration, licensing, and taxation regimes to ensure a uniform approach to law and policy on low-fee private schools. As such, a comprehensive overhaul of the regulation of APBET schools is required.

Keywords:   Kenya, low-fee private schools, education, APBET schools, Kenyan government, school regulation

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