Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Women and ReligionContemporary and Future Challenges in the Global Era$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Elisabetta Ruspini, Glenda Tibe Bonifacio, and Consuelo Corradi

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781447336358

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447336358.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM POLICY PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.policypress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Policy Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PPSO for personal use.date: 31 March 2020

The impact of religious unorthodoxy on family choices and women’s well-being in Turkey

The impact of religious unorthodoxy on family choices and women’s well-being in Turkey

Chapter:
(p.157) Eight The impact of religious unorthodoxy on family choices and women’s well-being in Turkey
Source:
Women and Religion
Author(s):

F. Kemal Kızılca

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447336358.003.0009

This chapter provides evidence from Turkey, a Muslim-majority country, on how religious unorthodoxy is related to the number of children and generations living in a household, both of which strongly link to women's time burden and, consequently, their well-being. It uses data from Turkish Household Consumption Surveys, which contain rich information regarding household-level consumption, household characteristics, and individual characteristics. The evidence from Turkish Household Budget Surveys supports the idea that women who live in ‘sinful’ households, that is households which do not follow Sunni dogmas in their consumption patterns, are faced with lesser burdens of childcare and elder care responsibilities.

Keywords:   Turkey, religious unorthodoxy, women, household, household consumption, Sunni dogmas

Policy Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.