Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
A Handbook of Food CrimeImmoral and Illegal Practices in the Food Industry and What to Do About Them$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Allison Gray and Ronald Hinch

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781447336013

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447336013.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM POLICY PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.policypress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Policy Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PPSO for personal use.date: 05 April 2020

Responding to food crime and the threat of the ‘food police’

Responding to food crime and the threat of the ‘food police’

Chapter:
(p.403) 24 Responding to food crime and the threat of the ‘food police’
Source:
A Handbook of Food Crime
Author(s):

Allison Gray

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447336013.003.0025

The contemporary corporate-industrial food system – the ‘risky food regime’ – produces a particular conceptualisation of food crime. Discursively, this global era of food constructs and maintains a risk discourse which normalises food crime and shifts blame for food harms away from food corporations, to responsibilise consumers for ‘food choice’. This has important consequences for food movements and activism – predominately constructing a false belief that consumers can change food systems through ‘buycotts’ and ‘voting with forks’. While there are many forms of resistance to food crime, food corporations actively counter or co-opt these efforts, largely through values aligned with corporate social responsibility. This is exemplified through specific defense strategies, such as greenwashing and nutriwashing, and broader tactics to accuse anyone intervening in consumers’ food choice as being ‘food police’. However, food corporations significantly mediate consumer choice themselves, and thus, ironically, are simultaneously key ‘food cops’ and key facilitators of food crime.

Keywords:   risky food regime, food movements, food choice, greenwashing, food police

Policy Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.