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Ageing in Everyday LifeMaterialities and Embodiments$
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Stephen Katz

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781447335917

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447335917.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM POLICY PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.policypress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Policy Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PPSO for personal use.date: 19 October 2019

Our Fitbits, our (ageing) selves: wearables, self-tracking and ageing embodiment

Our Fitbits, our (ageing) selves: wearables, self-tracking and ageing embodiment

Chapter:
Eleven Our Fitbits, our (ageing) selves: wearables, self-tracking and ageing embodiment
Source:
Ageing in Everyday Life
Author(s):

Barbara L. Marshall

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447335917.003.0011

This chapter considers the ways that embodied aging may be produced through wearable self-tracking technologies. With physical activity now promoted as key to the prevention of many age-related problems, and as inactivity becomes framed as irresponsible, the market for devices to both measure and motivate activity has expanded. While research in the biomedical and exercise sciences focuses on how self-tracking devices can enhance interventions aimed at behavior modification with older adults, this chapter draw on interviews with older users to argue that we need to attend more carefully to how the data produced by self-tracking circulates through the networks of technologies, relationships and regimes of expertise that are embedded in everyday social worlds.

Keywords:   self-tracking, embodiment, fitness, ageing, quantification

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