Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Ageing in Everyday LifeMaterialities and Embodiments$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Stephen Katz

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781447335917

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447335917.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM POLICY PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.policypress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Policy Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PPSO for personal use.date: 15 October 2019

Reinventing the nursing home: metaphors that design care

Reinventing the nursing home: metaphors that design care

Chapter:
(p.45) Three Reinventing the nursing home: metaphors that design care
Source:
Ageing in Everyday Life
Author(s):

Susan Braedley

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447335917.003.0003

Drawing on findings from team nursing home ethnographies in Canada, the UK, Sweden and the US, this chapter argues that new designs for nursing home care draw from a social imagination limited by contemporary ideals of individualism, practices of consumerism and structures of inequality. As newly built or renovated nursing homes are designed to support better care for frail older adults, a contradictory mix of policy aims has emerged, including improvements to economic efficiency and sustainability, better standards of care and wellbeing for residents, and efforts to create appealing, hospitable environments. The research brings critical attention to walls, gardens and furnishings, arguing that they not only shape the everyday life of frail old age but also reveal tensions between what residents and those who provide care require, what is designed for them and what is expected of them.

Keywords:   long-term care, ruling metaphors, design, equity, nursing home

Policy Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.