Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Professional Health Regulation in the Public InterestInternational Perspectives$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

John Martyn Chamberlain, Mike Dent, and Mike Saks

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781447332268

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447332268.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM POLICY PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.policypress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Policy Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PPSO for personal use.date: 16 June 2021

Governing complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in Brazil and Portugal: implications for CAM professionals and the public

Governing complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in Brazil and Portugal: implications for CAM professionals and the public

Chapter:
(p.181) Ten Governing complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in Brazil and Portugal: implications for CAM professionals and the public
Source:
Professional Health Regulation in the Public Interest
Author(s):

Joana Almeida

Pâmela Siegel

Nelson Barros

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447332268.003.0010

Sociological research on the governance of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in Western societies has vastly increased in the last decades. Yet there has been a less marked expression of qualitative studies which put such governance into comparative perspective. Furthermore, research has shown that CAM regulation in Western countries has been very diverse, and so is probably best conceptualised on a spectrum containing several regulatory models. This chapter investigates CAM’s modes of governance in two historically, culturally and politically related countries, Brazil and Portugal. It analyses the extent to which CAM governance has changed over time in these two countries, the main modes of CAM governance in these same countries, and the implications of these modes of CAM governance for CAM professionals themselves and the public. It is concluded that Brazil and Portugal present some similar patterns in the way they govern CAM, but also contrasting differences, particularly in relation to the status of these therapies within the public and the private health care systems, and the implications of this status for CAM professionals themselves and the wider public.

Keywords:   Brazil, Portugal, complementary and alternative medicine, governance

Policy Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.