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Professional Health Regulation in the Public InterestInternational Perspectives$
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John Martyn Chamberlain, Mike Dent, and Mike Saks

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781447332268

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447332268.001.0001

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Patterns of medical oversight and regulation in Canada

Patterns of medical oversight and regulation in Canada

Chapter:
(p.135) Eight Patterns of medical oversight and regulation in Canada
Source:
Professional Health Regulation in the Public Interest
Author(s):

Humayun Ahmed

Adalsteinn Brown

Mike Saks

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447332268.003.0008

Physicians in Canada are entrusted with one of the highest degrees of self-regulatory privilege of medical professionals, associated in neo-Weberian terms with exclusionary social closure in a competitive marketplace. To protect the public, though, such power must be accompanied by structures which successfully ensure that standards of professional quality are well defined and rigorously implemented. Yet little is known about the performance of presently implemented regulatory structures in medicine in Canada in terms of quality definition and assurance. Drawing on original research, this chapter provides an overview of the standards and regulatory goals and the various formal mechanisms for implementing these in Canada. As such, it will outline how provincial and territorial medical colleges explicitly and implicitly understand, describe, and put into practice their own standards of performance. Appropriate alignment of the colleges with quality assurance in this respect is considered vital in terms of the wider public good.

Keywords:   Canada, medical profession, quality, regulation

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