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Valuing Interdisciplinary Collaborative ResearchBeyond Impact$
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Keri Facer and Kate Pahl

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781447331605

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447331605.001.0001

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Evaluating legacy: the who, what, why, when and where of evaluation for community research

Evaluating legacy: the who, what, why, when and where of evaluation for community research

Chapter:
(p.45) Two Evaluating legacy: the who, what, why, when and where of evaluation for community research
Source:
Valuing Interdisciplinary Collaborative Research
Author(s):

Peter Matthews

Janice Astbury

Julie Brown

Laura Brown

Steve Connelly

Dave O’Brien

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447331605.003.0003

Evaluation is often anathema the co-produced research and community groups. For the latter, onerous evaluation requirements from funders can be the bane of their lives. In terms of co-produced research, that evaluation often positions an expert in authority to judge whether an activity has been a “success” is the opposite to the trusting relationship much co-produced research is trying to develop. This chapter suggests that evaluation, when done well, can and should be a more central practice in co-produced research. Importantly, it is suggested that by asking the difficult question of “what positive outcomes are we producing?” the evaluation of co-produced research can make it more ethical, and develop a learning approach among partners.

Keywords:   evaluation, ethics, outcomes, community benefits, coproduction

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