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Infrastructure in AfricaLessons for Future Development$
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Mthuli Ncube and Charles Leyeka Lufumpa

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781447326632

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447326632.001.0001

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Africa’s prospects for infrastructure development and regional integration: energy sector

Africa’s prospects for infrastructure development and regional integration: energy sector

Chapter:
(p.185) Six Africa’s prospects for infrastructure development and regional integration: energy sector
Source:
Infrastructure in Africa
Author(s):

Ethèl Teljeur

Mayuree Chetty

Morné Hendriksz

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447326632.003.0007

Energy sector development is required to enable greater regional economic integration (harmonization of legal and regulatory frameworks for energy, coordination of energy infrastructure investments, etc.) in Africa. This can address problems associated with fractured energy infrastructure investment and allowing African nations to develop more shared facilities. In addition, regional integration facilitates trade of energy resources and services via sub-regional power pools. Despite the current attempts to integrate regional infrastructure via power pools, actual trade within these pools is low, and the opportunity to derive efficiencies from integrated regional resource planning is missed in favour of national plans. Different stages and design of energy market liberalization or (re-) regulation and the desire for energy self-sufficiency (“security of supply”) hinder the development of bilateral or multilateral projects. Investment in interconnection capacity is required to facilitate intra-power pool trade and achieve the efficiencies associated with the pooling of demand and integrated energy planning.

Keywords:   energy market, economic integration, regulatory frameworks, infrastructure

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