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Education Policy and Racial Biopolitics in Multicultural Cities$
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Kalervo N. Gulson and P. Taylor Webb

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781447320074

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447320074.001.0001

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Policy and biopolitics: the event of race-based statistics in Toronto

Policy and biopolitics: the event of race-based statistics in Toronto

Chapter:
(p.35) Two Policy and biopolitics: the event of race-based statistics in Toronto
Source:
Education Policy and Racial Biopolitics in Multicultural Cities
Author(s):

Kalervo N. Gulson

P. Taylor Webb

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447320074.003.0004

This chapter connects race-based violence, ideas of counting and race-based statistics, with ideas about racial biopolitics. The focus is on two events. The first is a 2008 a report into school safety, the Falconer Report, which urged for the use of ‘race-based statistics’ in the Toronto District School Board (TDSB), which reignited the overall move towards Black-focused schooling. We connect this report, and its plea to use race-based statistics in discipline related incidents in schooling, to racial profiling and policing in Toronto in the early 2000s. The chapter concludes with the TDSB decision in 2004-5, to collect race-based statistics, as a second policy event that preceded the Falconer Report.

Keywords:   Black-focused schooling, Toronto District School Board, Falconer Report, school violence, race-based statistics, Ontario Human Rights Commission, biopolitics

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