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Living on the MarginsUndocumented Migrants in A Global City$
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Alice Bloch and Sonia McKay

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781447319368

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447319368.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM POLICY PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.policypress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Policy Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PPSO for personal use.date: 05 December 2020

Social networks and social lives

Social networks and social lives

Chapter:
(p.129) Six Social networks and social lives
Source:
Living on the Margins
Author(s):

Alice Bloch

Sonia McKay

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447319368.003.0006

The social networks, community engagement, activities outside of work and transnational relations of undocumented migrants are considered in this chapter. Most people had effectively and strategically built networks of friends while in the UK and this was instrumental to everyday lives, especially when looking for work. Family relations were often more complex than those with friends and difficulties could be accentuated between family members when it involved working relationships. By living in London, our interviewees either lived in enclave areas or had access to such areas, though this did not necessarily mean that these areas were always visited or explored; in some cases they were actively avoided. Nevertheless ethnic clusters facilitated community organisation, neighbourhood encounters, and sometimes conviviality, access to faith groups and cultural activities, as well as jobs and social lives and they were almost always with people from the same ethnic and/or linguistic group. While a minority participated in activities outside of work, either community based or some limited social activities, most were limited by finances and long working hours as well as the need try and stay hidden. Networks were carefully managed and this could result in loneliness and feelings of isolation.

Keywords:   Family, Friends, Community, Neighbourhoods, Relationships, Hidden

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