Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Religion and Welfare in EuropeGendered and Minority Perspectives$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Lina Molokotos-Liederman

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781447318972

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447318972.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM POLICY PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.policypress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Policy Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PPSO for personal use.date: 27 July 2021

Religion as a resource or as a source of exclusion? The case of Muslim women’s shelters

Religion as a resource or as a source of exclusion? The case of Muslim women’s shelters

Chapter:
(p.207) Ten Religion as a resource or as a source of exclusion? The case of Muslim women’s shelters
Source:
Religion and Welfare in Europe
Author(s):

Pia Karlsson Minganti

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447318972.003.0010

This chapter demonstrates, through a case study on women's shelters in Sweden, that it is not only the north–south divide that stands out in Europe, but also the conflictual notions of religion, and especially Islam, and secularity. It points to an assimilationist discourse that is widespread in Europe, which results in Muslim women being treated as victims of an oppressive religion. Such a normative secularism is dissolving religion as a resource and turning it into a source of exclusion. The shelter known as Somaya in Stockholm has been obliged to ‘tone down’ its Muslim profile by emphasising the idea of intersectionality as its political goal. The chapter then raises interesting questions about two frequently competing human rights, namely the freedom of religion and the rights of women—including those from minority religions.

Keywords:   women's shelters, Sweden, Islam, Muslim women, assimilationist discourse, normative secularism, Somaya, religious freedom, women's rights, minority religions

Policy Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.