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Disabled people, work and welfareIs employment really the answer?$
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Chris Grover and Linda Piggott

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781447318323

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447318323.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM POLICY PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.policypress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Policy Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PPSO for personal use.date: 17 April 2021

Why are the policies and organisations seeking to help disabled people access work failing?

Why are the policies and organisations seeking to help disabled people access work failing?

Chapter:
(p.69) Four Why are the policies and organisations seeking to help disabled people access work failing?
Source:
Disabled people, work and welfare
Author(s):

Bruce Stafford

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447318323.003.0004

In recent years successive British governments have implemented policies to promote employment opportunities for disabled people. The delivery of these programmes has been contracted out to a variety of public, private and third sector organisations who receive payment based on their performance. This chapter examines two major welfare-to-work programmes, the New Deal for Disabled People and Pathways to Work, and by applying the notions of adverse selection and moral hazard argues that those disabled people in the greatest need for support (because they are the furthest from the labour market) of are the least well served by the marketisation of disability employment programmes.

Keywords:   adverse selection, disabled people, employment programmes, New Deal for disabled people, moral hazard, marketisation, pathways to work

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