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Religious literacy in policy and practice$
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Adam Dinham and Matthew Francis

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781447316657

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447316657.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM POLICY PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.policypress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Policy Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PPSO for personal use.date: 22 September 2019

Religious illiteracy in school Religious Education*

Religious illiteracy in school Religious Education*

Chapter:
(p.167) Nine Religious illiteracy in school Religious Education*
Source:
Religious literacy in policy and practice
Author(s):

James C. Conroy

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447316657.003.0009

The curricula in school education (specifically for 14-16 year olds in the UK) is problematised in chapter nine. Conroy argues that both the teaching and examination of religion in schools simplifies, trivialises and makes irrelevant religious histories and thought. For example, schools are wary of considering truth claims, and so reduce religious arguments to personal, and therefore unchallengeable, interpretations. He explores how this contributes to a lack of critical insight and to religion not being taken seriously. It is further harmed, he suggests, by the way religious education is examined, which focuses on grades at the expense of an engagement with the issues, reducing complex issues like discourses on abortion to simplistic pre-coached answers.

Keywords:   religious literacy, RE, schools, truth claims, assessment

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