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The New Dynamics of Ageing Volume 1$
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Alan Walker

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781447314721

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447314721.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM POLICY PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.policypress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Policy Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PPSO for personal use.date: 25 September 2021

Biomechanical constraints to stair negotiation

Biomechanical constraints to stair negotiation

Chapter:
(p.277) Fourteen Biomechanical constraints to stair negotiation
Source:
The New Dynamics of Ageing Volume 1
Author(s):

Constantinos Maganaris

Vasilios Baltzopoulos

David Jones

Irene Di Giulio

Neil Reeves

James Gavin

Alistair Ewen

Stephanie King

Mike Roys

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447314721.003.0014

This chapter discusses strategies that older and younger people employ to negotiate stairs based on experiments performed on an instrumented staircase in lab environment aiming at identifying ways to reduce stair fall risk for the elderly. Stair negotiation was found to be more demanding for the knee and ankle joint muscles in older than younger adults, with the demand increasing further when the step-rise was higher. During descent of stairs with higher step-rises, older adults shifted the centre of mass (COM) posteriorly, behind the centre of pressure (COP) to prevent forward falling. A decreased step-going resulted in a slower descent of the centre of mass in the older adults and standing on a single leg for longer than younger adults. A greater reliance on the handrails and rotation of the body in the direction of the handrail was also observed when the step-going was decreased during descent, which allowed this task to be performed with better dynamic stability, by maintaining the COM closer to the COP. These findings have important implications for stair design and exercise programs aiming at improving safety on stairs for the elderly.

Keywords:   Stair Negotiation, Falls, Biomechanics, Dynamic Design, Safety

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