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Rethinking residential child carePositive perspectives$
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Mark Smith

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9781861349088

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781861349088.001.0001

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Residential child care in a continuum of care

Residential child care in a continuum of care

Chapter:
(p.137) nine Residential child care in a continuum of care
Source:
Rethinking residential child care
Author(s):

Mark Smith

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781861349088.003.0009

Awareness of theories of attachment and of the central importance of families in children's lives has brought about a reappraisal of the role of the family in work with children in care. Similarly, ideas of community ascribe an importance to ‘place’, even if for many children communities of origin might not always be safe or happy places. Like any child, children in care should be able to access a range of integrated services according to need. Residential child care needs to take into account and needs to instil in children a sense of both past and future, from whence they have come and of where they are going. Family is generally significant in any consideration of past and future, and residential workers need to become skilled in working with families. They also need to work with other services, such as throughcare and aftercare, and agencies with whom children come into contact. This chapter is concerned with how residential-child-care facilities need to take account of, and work effectively with, a range of family, social, and other professional networks.

Keywords:   residential child care, attachment, family, social networks, professional networks, throughcare, aftercare, integrated services, residential workers

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