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Disadvantaged by where you live?Neighbourhood governance in contemporary urban policy$
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Ian Smith, Eileen Lepine, and Marilyn Taylor

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9781861348951

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781861348951.001.0001

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More local than local government: the relationship between local government and the neighbourhood agenda

More local than local government: the relationship between local government and the neighbourhood agenda

Chapter:
(p.83) Five More local than local government: the relationship between local government and the neighbourhood agenda
Source:
Disadvantaged by where you live?
Author(s):

Eileen Lepine

Helen Sullivan

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781861348951.003.0005

This chapter considers the relationship between neighbourhood, decentralisation, and elected local government in the context of prevailing central-local relations. It examines the variety of motivations that have underpinned local authorities' ‘move to the neighbourhood’ over time, highlights some trends in decentralisation strategies, and identifies the key ‘trade-offs’ that have confronted local authorities pursuing a neighbourhood agenda. It pays particular attention to the role of ‘decentralisation’ and ‘neighbourhood’ in policy discourses and in those ‘processes of argument, acceptance and change’ through which ‘administrative doctrines’ — ideas about what is to be done — gain ground, while competing doctrines are ignored or treated ‘as heresies or outdated ideas’. It considers whether the persistent attraction of neighbourhood in the narratives of local governance lies in its imprecision — in its ability to contain contradiction and convey much that cannot quite be spelt out.

Keywords:   neighbourhood, decentralisation, local government, local governance, change, administrative doctrines, local authorities

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