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Women and New LabourEngendering politics and policy?$
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Claire Annesley, Francesca Gains, and Kirstein Rummery

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9781861348289

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781861348289.001.0001

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Engendering the machinery of governance

Engendering the machinery of governance

Chapter:
(p.93) Five Engendering the machinery of governance
Source:
Women and New Labour
Author(s):

Durose Catherine

Gains Francesca

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781861348289.003.0005

This chapter explores changes to the representation policies in the UK, Scottish, and Welsh legislatures, in local government and the nonelected state. It then investigates the way in which executive and administrative policies under New Labour have been engendered not only through the establishment of a Women's Policy Unit and mainstreaming policies, but, crucially, through the agency of individual policy actors in the Cabinet and the work of their departments. Local-government reforms included the abolition of the committee system and new roles for councillors as ‘community champions’. The explanations for low representation draw on similar supply-and-demand factors as other aspects of representation. The evidence reviewed also suggests that the increase in representation at Westminster requires further positive discrimination policies before a tipping point is reached. However, the experiences of the devolved governments provide a natural laboratory for future research.

Keywords:   representation policies, UK legislature, Scottish legislature, Welsh legislature, New Labour, executive policies, administrative policies, Women's Policy Unit

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