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Securing an urban renaissanceCrime, community, and British urban policy$
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Rowland Atkinson and Gesa Helms

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9781861348159

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781861348159.001.0001

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Urban renaissance and the contested legality of begging in Scotland

Urban renaissance and the contested legality of begging in Scotland

Chapter:
(p.219) Thirteen Urban renaissance and the contested legality of begging in Scotland
Source:
Securing an urban renaissance
Author(s):

Joe Hermer

David MacGregor

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781861348159.003.0013

This chapter analyses the campaign to re-criminalise begging by City of Edinburgh officials in the late 1990s and the response of the then Scottish Office. It examines how anti-begging ordinances reduce the homeless to the status of bare life and provides a paradigmatic example of anti-begging legislation, the Ontario Safe Streets Act. The chapter discusses the difficulties of Edinburgh officials in drafting an offence, the reasons advanced against the case of making begging illegal again, and the implications of legalised begging for urban renaissance.

Keywords:   begging, Edinburgh, Scottish Office, anti-begging ordinances, homeless, Safe Street Acts, urban renaissance

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