Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Unwrapping the European social model$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Amparo Serrano Pascual and Maria Jepsen

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9781861347985

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781861347985.001.0001

Show Summary Details

Social dialogue as a regulatory mode of the ESM: some empirical evidence from the new member states

Social dialogue as a regulatory mode of the ESM: some empirical evidence from the new member states

Chapter:
(p.233) Ten Social dialogue as a regulatory mode of the ESM: some empirical evidence from the new member states
Source:
Unwrapping the European social model
Author(s):

Céline Lafoucriere

Roy Green

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781861347985.003.0011

This chapter discusses the question of whether social partnership structures, in the new member states, are ready to receive the European social model (ESM) and respond to its demands. The focus is on organisational models, including the different countries' economic markets, highlighting the issue of the suitability of the ESM for these new members who carry strongly different traditions and historical backgrounds and whose future economic and social interests may also accordingly be rather different. The potential threats that these new member states represent for the future of European social dialogue and the ESM as a whole are also pointed out. There should be a crucial overall review both of a European-level social dialogue definition and of a more flexible European Employment Strategy in order to enable the new members to take the requisite resolutions. In the absence of such a process there exists a strong risk that the Anglo-Saxon model will become prevalent within the EU and thereby discredit the rather fragile ESM.

Keywords:   European Union, social model, economics, social dialogue, sociology

Policy Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.