Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The ethics of welfareHuman rights, dependency and responsibility$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Hartley Dean

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9781861345622

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781861345622.001.0001

Show Summary Details

Human rights and welfare rights: contextualising dependency and responsibility

Human rights and welfare rights: contextualising dependency and responsibility

Chapter:
(p.6) (p.7) One Human rights and welfare rights: contextualising dependency and responsibility
Source:
The ethics of welfare
Author(s):

Hartley Dean

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781861345622.003.0002

Human rights are an ideological fiction. This is not to diminish the concept; rather it is to acknowledge that the notion of a universally definable set of rights that are inherent to human beings by virtue of their humanity is a socially constructed ideal. Human rights are an expression neither of eternal verities nor mere moral norms, but of systematically derived principles or social values. This chapter examines the broader issues that flow from the distinctively liberal-individualist conception of human rights that is associated with globalisation. It provides an overview of the historical and conceptual background to human rights and human welfare before discussing the ways in which human rights discourse is entering current debates on global social development and European social protection. The chapter also provides alternative interpretations of human rights and uses the example of current ‘workfare’ policies in Europe to demonstrate the ways in which social rights are compromised because it is an interpretation of human rights that is ascendant.

Keywords:   human rights, globalisation, human welfare, global social development, European social protection, workfare policies, social rights

Policy Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.