Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Researchers and their 'subjects'Ethics, power, knowledge and consent$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Marie Smyth and Catherine Bond

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9781861345141

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781861345141.001.0001

Show Summary Details

Domestic violence and research ethics

Domestic violence and research ethics

Chapter:
(p.195) Eleven Domestic violence and research ethics
Source:
Researchers and their 'subjects'
Author(s):

The Domestic Violence Research Group, University of Bristol

Hilary Abrahams

Gill Hague

Ellen Malos

Melanie McCarry

Tais Silva

Emma Williamson

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781861345141.003.0012

The Domestic Violence Research Group (DVRG) conducts national, international and local studies on domestic violence and on other forms of violence against women. It also offers consultancy, teaching and training on the issue and works from an activist perspective. The DVRG works alongside Women's Aid. It is a principal national organisation working with abused women and their children, and has links in the activist movement in the country and abroad. The principles of the DVRG were derived from their long history of involvement with feminism and from an understanding of violence against women as a manifestation of inequality in society between men and women. This chapter evolved from an edited Round Table discussion on the ethics and sensitivities involved in researching domestic violence and other forms of violence against women with a group of researchers associated with the Domestic Violence Research Group (DVRG). The chapter addresses a number of ethical issues that arise in the course of conducting research. Although the focus is on social science research in the area of violence against women, the issues raised in this chapter are also transferable across a number of subject and disciplinary boundaries. From the potential impact of externally enforced governance, this chapter identifies those factors that, from the researcher's perspective, influence their interactions with research participants. The chapter also considers the positive and negative impact of practice on the conduct of research including the route of these contradictions which needs to be based on the realities of each project, the integrity of individual researchers, and a wider discussion about the purposes, role and governance of research in society.

Keywords:   Domestic Violence Research Group, domestic violence, violence against women, feminism, ethical issues, conducting research, social science research

Policy Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.