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Comparing social policiesExploring new perspectives in Britain and Japan$
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Misa Izuhara

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9781861343666

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781861343666.001.0001

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Ageing and intergenerational relations in Britain

Ageing and intergenerational relations in Britain

Chapter:
(p.48) (p.49) Three Ageing and intergenerational relations in Britain
Source:
Comparing social policies
Author(s):

Alan Walker

Kristiina Martimo

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781861343666.003.0004

This chapter examines the implications of population ageing for relations between the generations. It focuses on intergenerational caring relationships between kin rather than the macro-social contract on which the funding of pensions and health and social care are based. However, a key theme of this chapter is that, what society does by way of social policy has a critical bearing on the nature and experience of generational relations. In other words, a sharp distinction between micro-level interpersonal relations and macro-social and economic policy is misleading. This chapter covers three topics. First of all, it considers changing demography and the key policy challenges it raises and, particularly, the implications for care needs. Then, it discusses the nature of the social contract in Britain. Finally, it examines how and why intergenerational relations are changing.

Keywords:   population ageing, intergenerational caring, social policy, social contract, care needs

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