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What works?Evidence-based policy and practice in public services$
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Huw T.O. Davies, Sandra M. Nutley, and Peter C. Smith

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9781861341914

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781861341914.001.0001

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Learning from the past, prospects for the future

Learning from the past, prospects for the future

Chapter:
(p.351) Sixteen Learning from the past, prospects for the future
Source:
What works?
Author(s):

Huw Davies

Sandra Nutley

Peter Smith

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781861341914.003.0016

This chapter draws together a summary and set of conclusions from the wide-ranging contributions to this book. The preceding chapters have revealed a surprisingly long and rich history of the use of evidence in forming public sector policy and practice in the UK. However, they also point to major shortcomings in the extent of evidence available, the nature of that evidence, and the ways in which it is disseminated and used by policy makers and practitioners. This chapter focuses on cross-sector learning by using the experiences described thus far to explore key issues relating to evidence-based policy and practice: the appropriateness of developing evidence-based approaches; the nature of credible research evidence; securing the research capacity to meet policy makers' and practitioners' need for evidence; and ensuring that the evidence is used.

Keywords:   public sector policy, UK, cross-sector learning, evidence-based policy, research evidence

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