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Policy analysis in Japan$
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Yukio Adachi, Sukehiro Hosono, and Jun Iio

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781847429841

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847429841.001.0001

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Local governments and policy analysis in Japan after the Second World War

Local governments and policy analysis in Japan after the Second World War

Chapter:
(p.149) Ten Local governments and policy analysis in Japan after the Second World War
Source:
Policy analysis in Japan
Author(s):

Toshiyuki Kanai

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847429841.003.0010

Under the centralized intergovernmental system, local governments are generally not engaged in policy analysis. But if one local government wishes to make its own policy, it must conduct its own policy analysis. The policy analysis by local governments is categorized under three types: 1) voluntary local initiative, 2) consideration by other governments, and 3) adjustment to the national policy. The voluntary type is divided in the original style and demand style. The former leads local policy-making, but the latter calls for national decision. The consideration type included both horizontal diffusion style and national absorption one. There are four elements in local policy analysis; a) expert / professional policy analysis, b) scientific policy analysis in its strictest sense, c) analysis of politics and d) implementation-oriented. Every three types of local policy analysis is composed mainly not by a)b) expert / scientific elements but c) politics & d) implementation-oriented ones.

Keywords:   centralized, demand, adjustment, politics, implementation

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