Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Policy change, public attitudes and social citizenshipDoes neoliberalism matter?$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Louise Humpage

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781847429650

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847429650.001.0001

Show Summary Details

Social citizenship, neoliberalism and attitudinal change

Social citizenship, neoliberalism and attitudinal change

Chapter:
(p.17) Two Social citizenship, neoliberalism and attitudinal change
Source:
Policy change, public attitudes and social citizenship
Author(s):

Louise Humpage

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847429650.003.0002

This chapter identifies the pivotal shift from a Keynesian policy regime that institutionalised social citizenship to one driven by neoliberal values. It highlights how social citizenship as an intellectual concept was widely institutionalised and supported in the period following World War II. Significant economic and political challenges, however, threatened the institutions supporting social citizenship in the 1970s and 1980s. Most notably, the concept of citizenship became market-focused and oriented towards active labour market participation as neoliberal values came to dominate political thought. The second part of the chapter outlines this process of neoliberalisation, which is understood to have been implemented across three phases but with differing levels of success in varied policy areas and countries. A third section explores what the empirical literature on policy feedback tells us about neoliberalism’s potential impact upon public opinion. It also highlights good reasons why these findings may not necessarily be applicable to the New Zealand case, requiring the kind of historical, multi-faceted analysis this book provides.

Keywords:   Keynesianism, social citizenship, neoliberalism, active citizenship, policy feedback, neoliberalisation

Policy Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.