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The political economy of work security and flexibilityItaly in comparative perspective$
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Fabio Berton and Matteo Richiardi

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9781847429070

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847429070.001.0001

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Flexibility and social security

Flexibility and social security

Chapter:
(p.95) Six Flexibility and social security
Source:
The political economy of work security and flexibility
Author(s):

Fabio Berton

Matteo Richiardi

Stefano Sacchi

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847429070.003.0006

The aim of this chapter is to provide a comparative assessment of the actual opportunities given to non-standard workers to avail themselves of main income maintenance schemes. The main question is whether departures from standard labour relationships have consequences on the workers' actual ability to attain security from social protection schemes. This concerns not only the fact of having formal rights to some forms of social protection, but also, once the rights are formally acknowledged, the conditions to access a given scheme and the actual amount of the benefit provided by the scheme in question. Comparative analysis of the main schemes is carried out for Italy, Germany, Spain and Japan. The conclusion can be drawn that Bismarckian social protection systems are particularly ill-equipped to cope with departures from the standard employment relationship as a dependent, full-time, open-ended relationship.

Keywords:   Social security, Social protection, Unemployment benefits, Unemployment insurance, Unemployment assistance, Social assistance, Entitlement, Eligibility, Coverage

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