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Children, risk and safety on the internetResearch and policy challenges in comparative perspective$
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Sonia Livingstone and Leslie Haddon

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9781847428837

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847428837.001.0001

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Relating online practices, negative experiences and coping strategies

Relating online practices, negative experiences and coping strategies

Chapter:
(p.309) Twenty-Four Relating online practices, negative experiences and coping strategies
Source:
Children, risk and safety on the internet
Author(s):

Bence Ságvári

Anna Galácz

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847428837.003.0024

This chapter focuses on the presence of multiple risks in children's lives, using a complex approach that also takes account of the complex characteristics of the different coping strategies employed to obviate potential harm. Using multivariate analysis the results suggest evidence for the support of both usage and risk migration hypotheses in the case of risk, and for the vulnerability hypothesis in the case of harm. By analysing coping strategies the chapter suggests that only a small minority of children choose a single coping strategy. Most adopt more than one solution, which means that they mix the theoretically separate types of action in responding to harm. The results show that a sole passive type of coping is very rare among children, thus confirming the previous findings which indicate that children's responses are generally positive: most children feel empowered to seek social support or act on their own.

Keywords:   Online risk, Online harm, Risk migration, Vulnerability, Coping strategies, Multivariate analysis

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