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Social work in extremisLessons for social work internationally$
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Michael Lavalette and Vasilios Ioakimidis

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9781847427182

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847427182.001.0001

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Grassroots community social work with the ‘unwanted’: the case of Kinisi and the rights of refugees and migrants in Patras, Greece

Grassroots community social work with the ‘unwanted’: the case of Kinisi and the rights of refugees and migrants in Patras, Greece

Chapter:
(p.65) four Grassroots community social work with the ‘unwanted’: the case of Kinisi and the rights of refugees and migrants in Patras, Greece
Source:
Social work in extremis
Author(s):

Dora Teloni

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847427182.003.0005

In this chapter, the author reflects upon her engagement — as both a social worker and an activist — in the Kinisi movement, which has worked with refugees and migrants in Patras both to meet their needs and to campaign for political change in the way migrants and refugees are treated within the European Union. The champter describes the situation facing refugees in Greece, then looks at the development of Kinisi, before reflecting on the role of social work in the campaign. In political debate, a distinction is drawn between refugees, asylum seekers and migrants. Migrants are viewed as people who move for a job. Refugees are those who flee their home country because of political, religious or cultural oppression. An asylum seeker is someone who seeks formal recognition for their refugee status. The chapter argues that these distinctions are not helpful and so it refers to refugees, migrants and asylum seekers without distinction.

Keywords:   Patras, Greece, refugees, migrants, asylum seekers, Kinisi movement, social work

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