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Social policy review 22Analysis and debate in social policy, 2010$
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Ian Greener, Chris Holden, and Majella Kilkey

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9781847427113

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847427113.001.0001

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Service users and social policy: developing different discussions, challenging dominant discourses

Service users and social policy: developing different discussions, challenging dominant discourses

Chapter:
(p.226) (p.227) Ten Service users and social policy: developing different discussions, challenging dominant discourses
Source:
Social policy review 22
Author(s):

Beresford Peter

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847427113.003.0011

This chapter argues that the tensions inherent in the competing value systems around participation and involvement mean that there are risks for service users and their movements attached to participating in the state's and service system's user involvement agenda, an agenda which, through its origins in managerialist/consumerist approaches to social policy, is part of the pursuit of the marketisation of state welfare. It draws on examples from the experiences of two UK service user movements — the disabled people's movement and the survivors movement and identifies two key risks. It concludes by arguing for increased reflexivity on the part of service users and their movements around participation and involvement, as well as greater recognition, ideally in partnership with service users and their organisations, within academic social policy of the importance of the issue.

Keywords:   service users, user involvement agenda, managerialist/consumerist approaches, social policy, marketisation, state welfare, disabled people's movement, survivors movement

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