Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Kids onlineOpportunities and risks for children$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Sonia Livingstone and Leslie Haddon

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9781847424396

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847424396.001.0001

Show Summary Details

Parental mediation

Parental mediation

Chapter:
(p.199) sixteen Parental mediation
Source:
Kids online
Author(s):

Lucyna Kirwil

Maialen Garmendia

Carmelo Garitaonandia

Gemma Martínez Fernández

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847424396.003.0016

This chapter discusses parental mediation of children's internet use. When mediating their children's internet use parents favour social mediation over technical restrictions and restrictive rule making. Using social mediation, they prefer talking about the child's online activities subsequently to staying nearby or sitting next to the child while they are online. At least a quarter of parents in 2008 did not mediate their children's internet use at all. More educated parents do not use technical software because they trust their children, while less-educated parents may not know how to use it. Parental mediation depends on parents' characteristics, that is, parental role, education, and internet use. Parental mediation also depends on children's characteristics, with age being more important than gender.

Keywords:   children, internet use, parental control, online activities, social mediation

Policy Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.