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The rural housing questionCommunity and planning in Britain's countrysides$
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Madhu Satsangi

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9781847423856

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847423856.001.0001

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The British countryside: nostalgia, romanticism and intervention

The British countryside: nostalgia, romanticism and intervention

Chapter:
(p.9) Two The British countryside: nostalgia, romanticism and intervention
Source:
The rural housing question
Author(s):

Madhu Satsangi

Nick Gallent

Mark Bevan

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847423856.003.0002

Popular conceptions of rurality are not accidental, nor are they natural representations of fact. Rather they are transforming social constructs, based on received remembrance of a past, and on antipathy to the dual opposite of the urban set against idealisations of the rural. The media through literature, film, painting, radio, and newspapers have enforced and transmitted these idealisations. Rural spaces and places have also permeated to images and coffee table books which showed myriads of woodland villages and romanticised Shakespearean countryside. These images served as picture-perfect illustrations of rural idyll on a pantomime state than reality. Such constructs of the rural spaces are powerful because they shape views on what countryside is actually like and what it should be like. This chapter discusses the British countryside. It explores how different actors have shaped, and are empowered, and constrained by the rural idylls.

Keywords:   rurality, media, social construct, rural idylls, British countryside, Shakespeare

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