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Social Policy Review 21Analysis and debate in social policy, 2009$
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Kirstein Rummery, Ian Greener, and Chris Holden

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9781847423733

Published to Policy Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847423733.001.0001

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Tackling ignorance, promoting social mobility: education policy 1948 and 2008

Tackling ignorance, promoting social mobility: education policy 1948 and 2008

Chapter:
(p.48) (p.49) Three Tackling ignorance, promoting social mobility: education policy 1948 and 2008
Source:
Social Policy Review 21
Author(s):

Ruth Lupton

Howard Glennerster

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847423733.003.0003

This chapter provides a useful counterpoint, drawing on feminist scholarship to highlight the gendered nature of policy designed to tackle the evil of ‘idleness’. It points to the dilemma, unarticulated in the Beveridge reforms but an increasingly important one for policy makers, of how to treat women's paid and unpaid ‘work’ and contribution to the economy and well-being. It focuses particularly on the challenges posited by the rise in part-time working and lone parenthood, both notable by their absence from serious consideration in the Beveridge model but an increasingly salient feature of the contemporary social and economic organisation of society. It notes that the review of the limitations of the current welfare-to-work policies in tackling ‘idleness’ points to the continuing challenges facing policy makers.

Keywords:   feminist scholarship, idleness, Beveridge reforms, women's paid work, women's unpaid work, lone parenthood, welfare-to-work policies

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